The Most Uninspiring Dual Time Zone 2013 Basel Zenith Watch Real Shot

[Special Report from Watch House Basel] On April 25, 2013, the annual watch industry event Basel International Watch Fair kicked off. The watch house team went to Switzerland. In front of you, we will bring the exhibition report in the first time, and send the new watch pictures of major brands as soon as possible. Here are some real shots of the Basel Watch Show. Friends who like it can see it first.
 The French name ‘Montre d’aÈronef’ is a rich name. These aircraft instruments were originally designed for flight, and the conditions of use were extremely severe. The machinery was subjected to rigorous tests, such as withstanding sudden changes in temperature, severe vibrations, humidity, and changes in air pressure. The readability must also be impeccable when reading: the wide black matte dial and the hands and time markers coated with white fluorescent material form a sharp color difference, and the Arabic numeral time mark is also oversized. In order to make the operation of the watch more convenient, the crown is also specially designed so that the pilot can easily adjust the watch even when wearing gloves.

 The new Pilot ‘Type 20 Aircraft’ watch is a distinguished spokesman for Zenith’s early pilot series. With a diameter of 48 mm, the watch contains all the visual effects: a large onion-locked crown, large Arabic numerals with white super luminous coating. The wide black matte dial clearly sets off the satin black ruthenium metal super luminous paint hands. The pattern on the bottom cover is a medal engraved with a Brerio plane and the words ‘Montre d’AÈronef Type 20-ZENITH Flying Instruments’ (Type 20 aircraft watch-Zhenlishi flight instrument). The side of the case can be seen the Swiss Civil Aviation Registration Code ‘HB’ and the watch serial number.

 The watch is equipped with a Zenith Elite 693 automatic winding movement with a power reserve of 50 hours. This stainless steel case and brown leather watch has a time and minute display, a small second at 9 o’clock and two time zones. . If today’s travelers can adjust the time zone on the wrist, it was not easy in the past. In the 1820s, it was decided to use 86,400 seconds as a day as a unit of time for worldwide travel. In 1883, the United States became the first country to adopt a time zone. Until 1884, after the controversial Washington International Conference, the world was officially divided into 24 time zones, starting at Greenwich, England. Since then, Greenwich Mean Time has become World Standard Time (English: Greenwich Mean Time or GMT), and it has become the only timing standard for pilots around the world.
 

This is the famous ‘Red Baron’.

 Zenith wanted to pay tribute to one of the most outstanding legendary pilots of the time, the Red Baron, with a special edition two-zone time zone watch. Manfred Albrecht Freiherr von Richthofen, his real name, was born in Poland in May 1892 today. Manfred was very fascinated by the newly born aviation flight. He soon became a veritable fancy artist. His driving skills even paid tribute to the opposing camps in the World War. His fame and nickname originated from a red Fokker Dr.1 three-wing fighter he drove. Having accumulated 80 victories, he is the last spokesman of noble values ​​in the battle: meaning honor, fairness and courage.

 To commemorate the aviation genius that is still praised to this day, Zenith manufactures and launches a limited series of 500 watches: the Pilot Series ‘Type 20 Aircraft’ Red Baron Watch in the second time zone. Using black DLC-treated steel and a black hand-stitched leather strap, this watch is unique in its red second time zone indication, the Fokker Dr.1 three-wing engraved on the case back and the ‘Montre d’AÈronef Type’ 20-ZENITH Flying Instruments’ (Type 20 Aircraft Watch-Zhenith Flight Instruments). This watch is definitely a classic timepiece.

 

The pictures and information collected by the reporting team in front of the Watch House will be uploaded to the special topics in Basel, so stay tuned.
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